TheArtMarket.NYC

a consortium showcasing art exhibitions for global and local collectors highlighting galleries in New York City.
Exhibitions rotate weekly, showcasing galleries an average of 6 times per year, contributing to a release of 8-12 gallery shows every week.

[Based upon individual gallery programming]
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Galerie Lelong & Co.Viewing Room
Jack Barrett Viewing Room
Simon Lee GalleryViewing Room
Asya Geisberg GalleryViewing Room
Metro PicturesViewing Room
Foley GalleryViewing Room
De Buck GalleryViewing Room
False Flag GalleryViewing Room
Patrick Parrish Gallery Viewing Room

Galerie Lelong & Co.

Galerie Lelong & Co. represents prominent contemporary artists and estates from the United States, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. This uniquely diverse group includes mid-career and established artists at the forefront of the international art world working across all media.

"Seasons"

Artist: Etel Adnan

Galerie Lelong & Co., New York, is pleased to present Etel Adnan: Seasons, our second solo exhibition with the artist. The exhibition will show recent works by the artist, including wool tapestries, leporellos, and paintings. Known for her distinctive abstract landscapes conveyed in a harmonious palette, Adnan’s portrayal of forms, shapes, and gestures are explored in multiple mediums.

A brilliant colorist, Adnan conceives her works as visual poems, each color carefully chosen in writing a language of her own. The exhibition coincides with the release of her newest book, Shifting the Silence, a rumination on the process of aging.

Etel Adnan, Planète 12, 2020

Oil on canvas

13 x 8.7 inches (33 x 22 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.1 cm), GL14744

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Etel Adnan, Clairiére, 2020

Oil on canvas

13 x 8.7 inches (33 x 22 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.1 cm), GL14744

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The exhibition takes its title from Adnan’s poem “Surge” (2017) which asks: “Why do seasons who regularly follow their appointed time, deny their kind of energy to us?“ The poem ends with “we deal with a permanent voyage, the becoming of that which itself had become.” Reading Adnan’s poetry, the recurring themes of nature vis-à-vis the passage of time demonstrate a contemplation of one’s journeys in physical and inner spaces. Adnan continues this mode of inquiry in her visual language, containing multitudes within each piece and making room for interpretation and exploration.
Etel Adnan, Planète 17, 2020

Oil on canvas

36.2x25.2cm 13x8.7 inches(33 x 22 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.1 cm), GL14746

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Etel Adnan, Planète 8, 2019

Oil on canvas

13 x 9.5 nches (33 x 24 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.2 cm), GL14747

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A highlight of Seasons is Planètes, her new body of paintings depicting planets. During the pause of her activities under quarantine, Adnan reflected on the current pandemic; turning her eye for the landscape upwards as e began painting imaginary planets and satellites in vibrant skies, a completely new subject for the artist whose oeuvre spans six decades.
Etel Adnan, Etel Adnan, 2020

Oil on canvas

Four parts, each: 13 x 8.7 inches (33 x 22 cm)

Framed, each: 14.4 x 9.8 inches (36.5 x 25 cm), GL14722

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Etel Adnan, Le temps passe, 2017

Ceramic

11 x 15.75 inches (28 x 40 cm)

Framed: 11.6 x 16.3 x .8 inches (29.5 x 41.5 x 2 cm), GL12672

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Etel Adnan, Au matin, 2017

Wool tapestry

56.3 x 78.75 inches (143 x 200 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2298

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Etel Adnan, Liberté, 2017-18

Wool tapestry

55.5 x 79.5 inches (141 x 202 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2297

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The Planètes series is conceived in a vertical format, with a consistent circle of color appearing in varied forms. In some works, the circle occupies and fills the composition lengthwise and in others, seems to be moving off the canvas, leaving a semi-circle. An element representing an object from our daily lives—a bicycle or an apple—grounds the composition.
Etel Adnan, Vignoble, 2018

Tapestry

59 x 72.7 inches( 150 x 185.1 cm )

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2377

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Etel Adnan, Clairiére, 2019

Wool tapestry

62.25 x 78.38 inches (158.1 x 199.1)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2606

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In the early 1960s, Adnan discovered the mediums of wool tapestry and leporello. When her works were presented at Documenta 13 in 2012, the artist’s distinctive use of these materials was quickly established as key tenets of her practice. In the presentation, a lone mid-size tapestry was laid on a low table as a centrifugal anchor flanked by thirty-eight paintings. Inspired by her exposure to Persian carpets as a child, the artist had sought to realize her early designs over decades, engaging various international weavers before working with the historic Aubusson atelier PINTON. The unfolding of the leporellos included in the exhibition—accordion-folded booklets that reveal panoramic illustrations—immediately draws a kinship to Adnan’s literary practice and the act of reading. “I realized how much materials, for artists, are things that mediate thought… how much they become the elements of one’s expression, and instead of being just a support, they become in a way a co-author of one’s work,” writes Adnan.
Etel Adnan, L'Olivier, 2019

Wool tapestry

55.1 x 78.75 inches (140 x 200 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2662

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Upcoming museum exhibitions presenting works by Etel Adnan will be held at the Pera Museum, Istanbul, Turkey; Centro de Arte Contemporáneo C3A, Córdoba, Spain and the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Etel Adnan, Matinée récréative, 1970/2015

Wool tapestry

72.8 x 65 inches (185 x 165 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2079

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Jack Barrett

Jack Barrett is New York City based art gallery specializing in contemporary art.

"Dylan Vandenhoeck"

Artist: Dylan Vandenhoeck

I stand in Dylan’s studio facing three paintings. On all three canvases, warped crystal ball landscapes sit enveloped in color.

On my left, a night time Manhattanscape hangs like a crystal necklace resting on dark velvet. Car lights beneath an overpass become jewels while a traffic light swings like a heavy treasure. In the corner of the painting, a silent scream of white mimics the kind of peripheral phenomena generated by moving my head in circles.

Dylan Vandenhoeck, Chiasm / Afterimages, 2018/19

Oil on Canvas

84 x 74 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Window / Hallway, 2019

Oil on Linen

78 x 44 inches

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I stand in Dylan’s studio facing three paintings. On all three canvases, warped crystal ball landscapes sit enveloped in color.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, Plein Air Palette, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Plein Air/Pressure Phosphene, 2020

Oil over casein on linen

24 x 18 inches

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On my left, a night time Manhattanscape hangs like a crystal necklace resting on dark velvet. Car lights beneath an overpass become jewels while a traffic light swings like a heavy treasure. In the corner of the painting, a silent scream of white mimics the kind of peripheral phenomena generated by moving my head in circles.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, Window/Hallway, 2019

Oil on linen

78 x 44 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Mt. Kisco Walgreens, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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In the next painting, a row of suburban buildings bend around a telephone pole like a peaceful car accident, dragging a behind-my-eyelids red in its wake. Much like the first painting, this scene is as much an inner landscape as an interpretation of a place. I keep glancing at the backlit houses because they look like the kind of image that will disappear when I look away, like a reflection on moving water.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, East Broadway, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Co-op City, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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When I ask Dylan what he hopes someone looking at his paintings might feel, he says, “Different layers of experience are strange and difficult to trace.”
Dylan Vandenhoeck, What’s a Crop?, 2020

Oil on linen

28 x 24 inches

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We don’t usually talk about what we see when we close our eyes and nod yes. It’s different every time, and so it makes sense that these different types of imagery—abstract, observed, remembered—fit together into one experiential image. I find myself accepting the combination, because I too remember what it’s like to close my eyes in a field, or to feel consumed by the night.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, Running in Waveny Park, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Jumprope/Anxiety, 2020

Oil on linen

36 x 24 inches

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Dylan’s paintings propose an immersive, lived experience and ask me if I’m up for it.
Against the backdrop of a sociopolitical climate that is, as Dylan writes, “regressive on an existential level,” painting stands up for the notion of a “lived human experience” in the face of soundbites, echo-chambers, fake news, and our high-def, yet inarticulate, commander-in-chief.
I’m writing under COVID-19 quarantine—I am home, not sick, but not exactly well. Dylan’s paintings ask me to remember I am still whole, in my own skin, that I have memories, dreams, and reflections.
The paintings from the show remind me of running to the point of nausea, when exhaustion leads to a thought: you can articulate something without a name, but how? By being present in your experience. By participating in reality. By allowing an experience to change you.
See how vast and colorful my response is to his paintings. Yours probably is too. When I ask Dylan what he wants from a viewer, he says, “I would hope they would turn away and notice their own version of this.” There’s a sense of communion to his answer that echoes the way his body and vision seem to melt together in these paintings. I’m struck not by the intimacy, but by the type of intimacy. It’s athletic.
I’m writing under COVID-19 quarantine—I am home, not sick, but not exactly well. Dylan’s paintings ask me to remember I am still whole, in my own skin, that I have memories, dreams, and reflections.
The paintings from the show remind me of running to the point of nausea, when exhaustion leads to a thought: you can articulate something without a name, but how? By being present in your experience. By participating in reality. By allowing an experience to change you.
- Sarah Esme Harrison

Simon Lee Gallery

Simon Lee Gallery is an international art gallery representing over 35 established and emerging contemporary artists and estates.

"Pedestrian Profanities, Curated by Eric N. Mack"

Artist: Susan Cianciolo, Abigail Deville, Samuel Hindolo, Andy Robert, Cinzia Ruggeri, Section 8, Torey Thornton, Kandis Williams

Simon Lee Gallery, New York is pleased to present Pedestrian Profanities, a group exhibition of interdisciplinary artists, designers and polymaths curated by Eric N. Mack, which explores the relationship between fine art, design and fashion, and the ways in which they are activated by a participating body.

Susan Cianciolo, Two Maroon Women Watercolor on Brown Paper, 2001

Watercolor on Brown Paper

45.7 x 61 cm (18 x 24 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York

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Simon Lee Gallery, New York is pleased to present Pedestrian Profanities, a group exhibition of interdisciplinary artists, designers and polymaths curated by Eric N. Mack, which explores the relationship between fine art, design and fashion, and the ways in which they are activated by a participating body.
Susan Cianciolo, Sunburst Kit / Doll In Part, 2004-2015

Cotton doll parts, knit batten, crochet hat from 2004 wedding collection, cardboard, watercolor on paper, magazine tearsheets, tape, digital prints, collage from 'Angels Do Exist' and Purple Magazine photos on quilt

26.7 x 137.2 x 94 cm (10 1/2 x 54 1/8 x 37 1/8 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York, Photo: Leif Anderson

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The role of a mannequin in a storefront is to elicit a direct relationship between the consumer, their body and the garment; to engender a sense of its structure. In a similar way, the role of the viewer in the act of observing, or consuming, an artwork bestows value and radiant spirit: the art object, at its most sacred, should reflect altered systems of value, especially in observation of our world's brutalities. In contemplating either artwork or clothing, the viewer enacts a sense of embodiment outside of their-self – an act of transference.
Andy Robert, Smoking Gun, 2017

Oil and pencil on canvas

208.3 x 188 cm (82 1/8 x 74 1/8 in.)

Courtesy of the artist, Hannah Hoffman, Los Angeles and Greene Naftali, New York

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This exhibition imagines a case for the painted object to flee its support structures and need the body. To cling to the body, worn as smuggled modernity.' -Eric N. Mack
Kandis Williamsco, response-ability with/for the unknown Other, 2019-20

Xerox collage and ink on paper, framed

106.7 x 132.6 cm (42 1/8 x 52 1/4 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Essex Street / Maxwell Graham

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In Mack’s own immersive practice, the artist reconciles non-traditional attitudes to painting with architectural nuance, directly negotiating the disjoin between art and fashion, and investigating the ways in which each discipline intersects with and informs the other. Drawing on his own aesthetic conceptions, in Pedestrian Profanities Mack brings together a group of artists and designers that likewise grapple with notions of use and commodity value in their practices, interrogating consumption in the process, as well as questioning the ways in which aesthetics live with the body.
Torey Thornton, Resting Halt (naked), 2019

Acrylic medium and galvanized steel mending plates on wooden butcher block

142.9 x 142.2 cm (56 1/4 x 56 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles

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In common with Mack, each artist in this exhibition bridges the divide between performance, art, architecture and fashion, bypassing traditional function in favor of psychological connection, emotional communication and formal innovation. In the work of Cinzia Ruggeri, a surrealist sensibility transforms the viewer’s experience of embodied space; her interactive practice, and in particular her fashion design of the 1980s, invites us to reconsider our position in the world. Similarly, Susan Cianciolo’s collage and textile-based practice reflects on her experiences operating as a designer outside of the mainstream fashion industry, which she turned on its head with a holistic approach to a range of creative projects. Made with found materials, Torey Thornton’s mixed media abstractions gather a myriad of materials with personal associations for the artist. Volume and texture are central facets of their process, which, like Mack’s work, straddles the boundary between painting and sculpture.
Kandis Williams, Iconic face of Death Mask II, 2018

Vinyl print on plexi

76.2 x 138.4 cm (30 x 54 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles

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Both Abigail DeVille and Samuel Hindolo engage with forgotten or unknown histories. DeVille’s site- specific works are constructed from a tapestry of found objects that intrinsically connect the art object to its site of exhibition. Exploring material culture, the artist is fundamentally concerned with reclaiming the abandoned, overlooked and making the invisible visible. By contrast, Hindolo’s work is figurative yet fictive, constructing scenes from the artist’s own image archive that are nonetheless equally absorbed in the illumination of peripheral or misunderstood figures. Kandis Williams’ collages confront issues of race, representation and the lived experience of the human body. Like in DeVille’s work, the dense layering of content in works such as co-response-ability with/for the unknown Other, 2019-20, is haptic and expressive, while bringing structure to complex themes.
Cinzia Ruggeri, Multicolor, 2019

Leather

13 x 20 x 13 cm (5 1/8 x 7 7/8 x 5 1/8 in.)

Courtesy Archivio Cinzia Ruggeri and Galleria Federico Vavassori, Milan, Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

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Working predominately as a stylist and creative director, Akeem Smith, founder of clothing label SECTION 8, has been a key figure in defining fashion’s underground through his use of cross-cultural references and striking imagery, which seeks to smash gender and beauty ideals. His deeply personal approach investigates the slippages between memory, archive, and history, and, in turn, the weight of visibility and representation, and lately his creative language has found new forms of expression: ‘I’ve found there are a lot of limitations with styling and designing, but when creating what I would consider a sculpture, there is much more freedom.’
Like many of the artists in this exhibition, painter Andy Robert has a deeply personal and experimental approach to his medium. Working on the edge of representation, photographs of people and places he sees in Harlem every day, are taken apart and put back together again through the expressive and experimental possibilities of paint. His approach to painting negotiates how a contemporary image is made, understood and seen – its contextualization. His paintings and works on paper reflect private and public conversations, a sense of community and isolation, and above all absorb voice, narrative and witness of life in the metropolis.

Asya Geisberg Gallery

Asya Geisberg Gallery presents a visually eclectic and conceptually focused program of thought-provoking contemporary art. AGG showcases art that manages to stand out and translate across multiple arenas of discourse, art history, and culture.

"The Art of Labor"

Artist: Rodrigo Valenzuela

Rodrigo Valenzuela works across photography, video, and installation, merging his interest in art history, architecture, the concept of work, and the realities of laborers. Valenzuela builds scenes in his studio, often working with simple building materials such as cinder blocks, pipes, wooden palettes, corrugated metal, and two-by-fours. The resulting monochrome photographs constantly shift between flatness and architectural space, and between documentary photography and fiction, encouraging an incessant yet pleasurable tension.

26 E 64th St 2nd floor, New York, NY 10065, United States

Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 8, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Toward Hedonic Reversal No. 5, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela works across photography, video, and installation, merging his interest in art history, architecture, the concept of work, and the realities of laborers. Valenzuela builds scenes in his studio, often working with simple building materials such as cinder blocks, pipes, wooden palettes, corrugated metal, and two-by-fours. The resulting monochrome photographs constantly shift between flatness and architectural space, and between documentary photography and fiction, encouraging an incessant yet pleasurable tension. His compositions resemble miniature ruins built from studio detritus, and are documentative of the artist's performance in the studio. Simultaneously, they clearly reference certain Modernist masters - be it Abstract-Expressionist painters or Minimalist sculptors - as well as Latin-American Brutalist architecture.
Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 6, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 12, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Valenzuela's interest in the political history and capitalism of construction is evident in the way he reuses and remixes objects before the camera. In Stature, his exhibition at Asya Geisberg Gallery, discarded consumer packaging is cast in concrete to create sculptures that could be Brutalist buildings or small abstract forms, elegant objets d’art or perhaps monuments to oppressive political regimes. Whether in “classic” black and white, low-contrast grey, or sepia works in the series Hedonic Reversal (2014), Barricade (2017), American Type (2018), and Stature (2020), Valenzuela consistently generates his own photographic vocabulary to present visually ambiguous images that resist easy categorization.
Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 15, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 16, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Barricade No. 6, 2017

Archival pigment print mounted on Dibond

55 x 45 inches

Edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Barricade No. 3, 2017

Archival pigment print mounted on Dibond

55 x 45 inches

Edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Images from left to right: Barricade No. 4, Barricade No. 5, 2017

archival pigment print mounted on Dibond

55 x 45 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Images from left to right: American-type #9, American-type #8, American-type #6, 2017

archival pigment print mounted on Dibond,

55 x 45 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, American-type #13, 2018

Archival pigment print

54" x 44", edition of 3 plus 1 AP

44" x 36", 1 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela (b. 1982 in Chile) lives and works in Los Angeles. He completed an art history degree at the University of Chile (2004), then worked in construction while making art over his first decade in the United States, completing a BA in Philosophy at Evergreen College (2010) and an MFA at the University of Washington (2012). Currently, Valenzuela is an assistant professor in the Department of Art at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture.
Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 1, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 3, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 4, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 5, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 6, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 7, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 8, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 10, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Metro Pictures

Metro Pictures was founded in 1980 by Janelle Reiring, formerly of Leo Castelli Gallery, and Helene Winer, formerly of Artists Space, at 169 Mercer Street in New York.

"Cindy Sherman"

Artist: Cindy Sherman

For her latest body of work, Cindy Sherman has transformed herself into an extraordinary cast of androgynous characters, expanding her career-long investigation into the construction of identity and the nature of representation. The enigmatic figures pictured in the ten new photographs on view are dressed primarily in men’s designer clothing and are posed gallantly in front of digitally manipulated backgrounds composed from photographs Sherman took while traveling through Bavaria, Shanghai, and Sissinghurst (England). Each character draws the viewer in with their unique style, immediate eye contact and steely gaze.

Renowned for her depictions of female stereotypes, Sherman has played with masculinity and gender expression before. In a series referred to as "Doctor and Nurse,” Sherman became both a male and female character, embodying stereotypical mid-century professional archetypes. In the “History Portrait” series, Sherman became both male aristocrats and clergymen. In her more recent clown series, the artist donned layers of face paint and shapeless costumes, eliminating the question of gender for many of the characters.

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #609, 2019

Dye sublimation print

62 1/2 x 91 1/4 inches (158.8 x 231.8 cm).

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #610, 2019

Dye sublimation print

74 1/2 x 90 inches (189.2 x 228.6 cm).

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For her latest body of work, Cindy Sherman has transformed herself into an extraordinary cast of androgynous characters, expanding her career-long investigation into the construction of identity and the nature of representation. The enigmatic figures pictured in the ten new photographs on view are dressed primarily in men’s designer clothing and are posed gallantly in front of digitally manipulated backgrounds composed from photographs Sherman took while traveling through Bavaria, Shanghai, and Sissinghurst (England). Each character draws the viewer in with their unique style, immediate eye contact and steely gaze.
Cindy Sherman, Untitled #611, 2019

Dye sublimation print, 91 x 107 1/4 inches (231.1 x 272.4 cm

1 x 107 1/4 inches (231.1 x 272.4 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #612, 2019

Dye sublimation print66 x 100 inches (167.6 x 254 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #613, 2019

Dye sublimation print

79 1/4 x 101 3/4 inches (201.3 x 258.4 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #614, 2019

Dye sublimation print

91 x 91 inches (231.1 x 231.1 cm)

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Renowned for her depictions of female stereotypes, Sherman has played with masculinity and gender expression before. In a series referred to as "Doctor and Nurse,” Sherman became both a male and female character, embodying stereotypical mid-century professional archetypes. In the “History Portrait” series, Sherman became both male aristocrats and clergymen. In her more recent clown series, the artist donned layers of face paint and shapeless costumes, eliminating the question of gender for many of the characters.
Cindy Sherman, Untitled #615, 2019

Dye sublimation print

91 x 91 inches (231.1 x 231.1 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #618, 2019

Dye sublimation print

68 1/2 x 82 1/2 inches (174 x 209.6 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #602, 2019

Dye sublimation print, 76 1/4 x 87 1/2 inches (193.7 x 222.3 cm)

76 1/4 x 87 1/2 inches (193.7 x 222.3 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #603, 2019

Dye sublimation print

84 3/4 x 77 inches (215.3 x 195.6 cm)

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One of the most influential artists of her generation, Cindy Sherman is currently the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris that runs from September 23 through January 3, 2021, following major retrospective exhibitions in 2019 at the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Vancouver Art Gallery. Her 2012 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, traveled to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Dallas Museum of Art. Additional recent exhibitions include Fosun Foundation, Shanghai; the inaugural exhibition at the Broad Museum, Los Angeles; Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; and Astrup Fearnley Museum, Oslo. Sherman has participated in four Venice Biennales, co-curating a section at the 55th exhibition in 2013. Her work has been included in five iterations of the Whitney Biennial, two Biennales of Sydney, and the 1983 Documenta. She is the recipient of the 2020 Wolf Prize in Arts and has also been awarded the Praemium Imperiale, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Foley Gallery

FOLEY brings together fine line and obsessive precision in the disciplines of drawing, cut paper, painting, and photography. Michael Foley opened Foley Gallery in the fall of 2004 after several years of working with notable photography galleries including Fraenkel Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Yancey Richardson Gallery.

"Foley Windows October & November 2020"

Artist: Alexis Duque ,Deborah Simon,Peter Callesen, Evri Kwong ,Rosalind Solomon, Thomas Allen, Stan Squirewell, Chrissy Angliker, Joana Ricou, Weronika Gęsicka, Alexandre Orion, Thomas Allen, Martin Klimas, Wyatt Gallery

Group Show

Alexis Duque , Dwelling, 2018

Cardboard, modeling paste, ink and acrylic paint

20h x 10w x 10d in

$ 4,000.00

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FOLEY brings together fine line and obsessive precision in the disciplines of drawing, cut paper, painting, and photography.
Alexis Duque , Tower, 2017

Cardboard, modeling paste, ink and acrylic paint

24h x 9w x 9d in

$ 4,000.00

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Alexis Duque, Monolith, 2015

Polystyrene foam, resin, ink and acrylic paint

13h x 5w x 5d in

$ 1,800.00

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Michael Foley opened Foley Gallery in the fall of 2004 after several years of working with notable photography galleries including Fraenkel Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Yancey Richardson Gallery.
Deborah Simon , Flayed Rabbit: Albino with Cells, 2018

polymer clay, faux fur, linen, embroidery floss, acrylic paint, glass, wire and foam

26h x 10w x 8d in

$ 3,900.00

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Deborah Simon , Flayed Rabbit: Albino with Nerves, 2017

polymer clay, faux fur, linen, embroidery floss, acrylic paint, glass, wire and foam

26h x 10w x 9d in

$ 3,900.00

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Michael Foley was born in Delaware and grew up in Croton-on-Hudson, New York. He opened his gallery in the fall of 2004 after fourteen years of working with notable photography galleries including Fraenkel, Howard Greenberg and Yancey Richardson.
Peter Callesen , Untitled (Falling Skeleton), 2013

Acid-free A4 160 gsm paper, glue, acrylic paint and coloured oak frame

19h x 14.50w in

$ 5,200.00

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Evri Kwong , Mom's at it again, 1996

Ink and Watercolor

12h x 8w in

$ 1,500.00

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Photography has been a passion since his high school days as a staff yearbook photographer. His personal art making practice is equally inspired by collage, cut paper and painting. In 2006, he brought artists within theses disciplines to the list of exhibiting gallery artists.
Rosalind Solomon , An East Village Painter, 1986

Gelatin Silver Print

20h x 16w in

$ 6,000.00

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Thomas Allen , NT567 (SHIPWRECK), 2015

Chromogenic Print

10h x 8w in

Edition of 10

$ 2,000.00

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Foley went on to co-found The Exhibition Lab in the fall of 2009. The Ex Lab is a study center for people involved in various aspects of fine art photography.
Stan Squirewell , Contemplation of Desdemona, 2020

Mixed media collage & shou sugi ban carved frame

21h x 17w in

$ 3,800.00

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Chrissy Angliker , Little Threes, 2019

Acrylic on Canvas

20h x 16w in

$ 3,500.00

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Joana Ricou , One, No One and One Hundred Thousand No. 30, 2019

Mixed Media on Wood

8h x 8w x 2d in

$ 450.00

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Weronika Gęsicka, Untitled #56, 2015-2018

Archival Pigment Print

12.60h x 15.75w in

Edition 2 of 5

$ 2,500.00

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Alexandre Orion , Metabiotica 16, 2004

Chromogenic Print

20.50h x 30w in

$ 2,300.00

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Thomas Allen , Terror, 2004

Chromogenic Print

20h x 24w in

Edition 5 of 15

$ 2,500.00

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Martin Klimas , Untitled, 2013

Pigment Print

35h x 28w in

Edition of 5

$3,800 + $550 Frame

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Wyatt Gallery , W4TH: 016.8 8, 2017

UV Cured Pigment Ink on Dibond

24h x 103w in

Edition of 5

$9,500

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Foley continues his interest in educating by serving on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts and the International Center of Photography where he teaches and lectures on issues in contemporary photography.

De Buck Gallery

Founded in 2011 by international art dealer, David De Buck, De Buck Gallery focuses on contemporary artists, from emerging to mid career, and is deeply committed to innovative artists’ projects and exhibitions. De Buck presents artists who are art scene leaders across their disciplines with a strong curatorial following and critical acclaim. The gallery programming engages contemporary talent such as Rashaad Newsome, Devan Shimoyama, Stephen Towns, Sharif Bey and Juan Garaizabal. Shows such as “Sweet” (2017) by Devan Shimoyama demonstrate the gallery’s cutting-edge and cross-disciplinary approach with dynamic new multi-media programming and performance.

"A Songbook Remembered"

Artist: Stephen Towns

NEW YORK—De Buck Gallery is pleased to announce A Songbook Remembered, Stephen Towns’ second solo exhibition with the gallery. A Songbook Remembered will feature a collection of new quilt work and will be on display at 507 West 27th Street from October 15th to November 28th, as well as in De Buck’s virtual viewing room from October 22nd, as part of the gallery’s digital programming.

Ancestral music is at the heart of Towns’ new work, a quilted collection of imagined historical narratives with imagery drawn directly from the poetry of African American spirituals. This powerful work represents a deeply personal and emotional evolution within Towns’ quilting practice, as he turned to both spiritual music and back to the process of quilting as acts of comfort during the uncertainty of COVID-19. Towns’ intricate stitch work is guided by songs of joy, hope, resilience, and protest and the creative process itself functioned, for the artist, as an act of remaining present in a time of chaos.

Stephen Towns, Deep River, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, Available polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads, cowrie shells

SIZE (CM):99.1 x 132.2 cmSIZE (IN):39 x 48.5 in

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NEW YORK—De Buck Gallery is pleased to announce A Songbook Remembered, Stephen Towns’ second solo exhibition with the gallery. A Songbook Remembered will feature a collection of new quilt work and will be on display at 507 West 27th Street from October 15th to November 28th, as well as in De Buck’s virtual viewing room from October 22nd, as part of the gallery’s digital programming.
Stephen Towns, Crucifixion, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass and resin beads, resin buttons.

SIZE (CM):102.2 x 118.7 cmSIZE (IN):40.25 x 46.75 in

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Ancestral music is at the heart of Towns’ new work, a quilted collection of imagined historical narratives with imagery drawn directly from the poetry of African American spirituals. This powerful work represents a deeply personal and emotional evolution within Towns’ quilting practice, as he turned to both spiritual music and back to the process of quilting as acts of comfort during the uncertainty of COVID-19. Towns’ intricate stitch work is guided by songs of joy, hope, resilience, and protest and the creative process itself functioned, for the artist, as an act of remaining present in a time of chaos.
Stephen Towns, Go Down Moses, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads, metal buttons.

SIZE (CM):124.5 x 96.5 cmSIZE (IN):49 x 38 in

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Stephen Towns, Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads.

SIZE (CM):121.9 x 94 cmSIZE (IN):48 x 37 in

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A Songbook Remembered began with Towns’ experience of listening to spirituals and a continued interest in the links between past and present. The quilts, though reflective of the contemporary struggles of both a global pandemic and the nation’s confrontation with racial violence and inequality, simultaneously allude to and mirror the legacy of African American history through his imagery and choice of materials. In order to capture the feeling of history, Towns set his narratives between the late 1800s and early 1900s and sourced historical patterns and fabric to create a textural sense of time for his viewers. The work is both healing and revolutionary, with compositions that depict jubilant declarations of faith, quiet moments of solace, and vibrant imagery of resistance. As part of the gallery’s digital programming, the accompanying online exhibition will feature a playlist of African American spirituals curated by Stephen Towns, as well as a series of ‘De Buck Gallery Voices,’ the gallery’s intimate new audio project that allows visitors to listen to the artists themselves as they discuss pieces from their studios.
Stephen Towns, Mary Had a Baby, 2020

Natural and synthe fabric, polyester and coPon thread, crystal glass and resin beads, metal button.

SIZE (CM):119.4 x 93.3 cmSIZE (IN):47 x 36.75 in

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Stephen Towns, Somebody’s Knocking at Your Door, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads.

SIZE (CM):99.1 x 123.2 cmSIZE (IN):39 x 48.5 in

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Stephen Towns is a painter and fiber artist working primarily in oil, acrylic and quilting. His work explores the African Diaspora and examines how American history influences contemporary society. Towns draws much of his visual inspiration from Medieval altarpieces, impressionist paintings, and wax cloth prints. The work he creates is deeply rooted in the constructs of race and its effects on society. It is developed in direct response to issues that have affected African-American culture–issues such as loss of ancestral roots, slavery, class, education, skin tone and religion. The subjects in Towns’s works are not only glimpses of the sitters; they are also a reflection of himself and mirror his struggle to attain a sense of self-knowledge, self-worth and spirituality. His practice provides an avenue for him to process all that he has learned about the violence of American history and imparted a framework on how to navigate and articulate the current anger and frustration that exists throughout the world today. Towns’ ongoing quilt series celebrates the aesthetic traditions of African American women while exploring America’s history of slavery and labor. The quilts speak to how fabric preserves memory, both in Towns’ often deeply personal connection to his materials as well as through the narratives he depicts of historical African Americans, including repeated references to Harriet Tubman.
Stephen Towns, Little David Play on Your Harp, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads, glass and resin buttons.

SIZE (CM):102.9 x 124.5 cmSIZE (IN):40.5 x 49 in

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Stephen Towns was born in 1980 in Lincolnville, South Carolina, and received a Bachelor of Fine Art in painting from the University of South Carolina. His work has been exhibited nationally, including solo exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Galerie Myrtis, York College, Goucher College, as well as group exhibitions at Jack Shainman Gallery: The School, August Wilson Cultural Center, Arlington Art Center, The David C. Driskell Center, Montpelier Arts Center, Star- Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum . His work has been featured in publications such as the New York Times, Artforum, the Washington Post, Hyperallergic, Cultured Magazine, AfroPunk, Hype Beast and the American Craft Council Magazine. Towns was honored as the inaugural recipient of the 2016 Municipal Art Society of Baltimore Travel Prize and received a Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance Rubys Artist Grant in 2015. In 2018, Towns was a semi-finalist for the Sondheim Artscape Prize and awarded a MD State Arts Council’s Individual Artist Award. Towns’s work is in the private collections of The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) , Art + Practice, artist Mark Bradford’s nonprofit based in Leimert Park, Los Angeles, The Petrucci Family Foundation , The Baltimore Museum of Art, the City of Charleston, South Carolina, The Nelson Atkins Museum, St. Louis, Missouri, and is held in private collections nationally and abroad . In 2022, Towns will exhibit Declaration and Resistance, a solo exhibition of paintings and quilts at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Pennsylvania. Towns currently lives and works in Baltimore, MD.
Stephen Towns, Wade in the Water, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads.

SIZE (CM):99.1 x 116.8 cmSIZE (IN):39 x 46 in

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False Flag Gallery

FALSE FLAG pursues projects that would otherwise remain unrealized.

"Abstraction in the Black Diaspora | Curated by Tariku Shiferaw & Ayanna Dozier"

Artist: Tariku Shiferaw, Adebunmi Gbadebo, Alteronce Gumby, Ashanté Kindle

FALSE FLAG is pleased to present “Abstraction in the Black Diaspora,” curated by Tariku Shiferaw and Ayanna Dozier, with work by Adebunmi Gbadebo, Alteronce Gumby, Ashanté Kindle, and Shiferaw. A newly-published text by Ayanna Dozier, “Rebellious Inventions: Abstraction in the Black Diaspora,” accompanies the exhibition.

The exhibition is on view from October 24 through December 13, 2020. An extended opening reception will be held on October 24th - from 2pm to 7pm - to allow for staggered entries throughout the day to accommodate safety and social distancing measures. A series of remote discussions with the artists and curators will be scheduled throughout the exhibition’s run – dates forthcoming

Adebunmi Gbadebo, Blues People, 2020, 2020

Black hair, cotton, rice paper, indigo dye and printed photographs on rice paper

110 x 120 in 24 x 20 in each (variable)

(AdG.ABD.02)

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Adebunmi Gbadebo, Da Da, 2015

Human hair locks and wire

3x x 120 x 5 in (variable)

(AdG.ABD.03)

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Adebunmi Gbadebo, I Sang the Blues (diptych), 2018-2019

Human hair locks and thread

48 x 75 in

(AdG.ABD.01)

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Tariku Shiferaw, Kenya, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

72 x 108 in

(TS.ABD.01)

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Tariku Shiferaw, Get Me Home (Foxy Brown), 2020

Acrylic on canvas

60 x 48 in

(TS.ABD.02)

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Tariku Shiferaw, Nigeria, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

36 x 49 in

(TS.ABD.03)

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Alteronce Gumby, Black Star, 2019

Oil on panel

54 x 70 in

(AG.ABD.01)

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Alteronce Gumby, Seed of the Soul, 2020

Tempered glass & acrylic on wood

54 x 70 in

(AG.ABD.02)

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Ashanté Kindle, The Crown, 2020

Acrylic & spackle on canvas

120 x 120 in

(AK.ABD.01)

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Ashanté Kindle, Beep Me 911, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.02)

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Ashanté Kindle, Sock it to Me, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.03)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 10, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.09)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 11, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.10)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 5, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.07)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 6, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.06)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 7, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.05)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 8, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.04)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 9, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.08)

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Patrick Parrish Gallery

Patrick Parrish Gallery exhibits the unusual, new, and sometimes overlooked modernist artists and designers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

"Homelife | Julian Watts"

Artist: Julian Watts

Patrick Parrish Gallery is thrilled to present Homelife, Julian Watts’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. In Homelife Watts explores the idea of the home and how it functions as a poetic, living landscape that we not only live in, but are a part of. Working while locked down in his remote rural Oregon studio during the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, Watts delved deep into his home environment, attempting to understand it on an intimate level as well as recognizing its place within a larger natural context. Watts engaged in an examination of functional everyday home objects such as furniture, bowls, and vessels, and quickly expanded outwards to a more cosmological view of home, exploring the geology, trees, rivers, and night sky that make up his rural setting. By exploring the perspectives of what constitutes a home in this way, the exhibition presents the objects we engage with and the spaces we live in with the complexity of a biological ecosystem and, in doing so, blurs the line between the home and its inhabitants.

The process and materials used reflect this idea on a fundamental level: the work is made primarily from locally salvaged hardwoods from Western Oregon near Watts’s studio and carved using a combination of traditional hand carving tools and modern power carving techniques. In this way the forests that define the region have been reanimated into new abstract representations of the landscape, as well as into surreal household objects and furniture that illuminate how our homelife is more deeply rooted in the greater natural landscape than we often recognize.

Julian Watts, Tree, 2020

Bleached maple, walnut, oak, redwood, ash, pine, fir, India ink

95 × 38 × 41 inches

85000

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Patrick Parrish Gallery is thrilled to present Homelife, Julian Watts’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. In Homelife Watts explores the idea of the home and how it functions as a poetic, living landscape that we not only live in, but are a part of. Working while locked down in his remote rural Oregon studio during the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, Watts delved deep into his home environment, attempting to understand it on an intimate level as well as recognizing its place within a larger natural context.
Julian Watts, Trail at Night, 2020

Carved eucalyptus branches stained with India ink

44 × 95 ½ × 7 inches

$22,000.00

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Julian Watts, Moon, 2020

Bleached maple and alabaster

45 × 45 × 5 ¾ inches

$45,000.00

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Watts engaged in an examination of functional everyday home objects such as furniture, bowls, and vessels, and quickly expanded outwards to a more cosmological view of home, exploring the geology, trees, rivers, and night sky that make up his rural setting.
Julian Watts, Stream, 2020

Bleached maple with pink stain

48 × 35 ¾ × 3 inches

INQUIRE
Julian Watts, Ridge at Night, 2020

Maple stained with India Ink

Installed: 42 × 146 × 3 inches

Each: 42 × 72 × 3 inches

$64,000.00 (Pair)

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By exploring the perspectives of what constitutes a home in this way, the exhibition presents the objects we engage with and the spaces we live in with the complexity of a biological ecosystem and, in doing so, blurs the line between the home and its inhabitants.
Julian Watts, Bench, 2020

Bleached maple with pink stain

20 × 84 × 14 inches

$28,000.00

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Julian Watts, Black Painting (New Moon), 2020

Maple stained with India Ink, Walnut Frame

48 × 36 ¼ × 2 inches

$18,500.00

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The process and materials used reflect this idea on a fundamental level: the work is made primarily from locally salvaged hardwoods from Western Oregon near Watts’s studio and carved using a combination of traditional hand carving tools and modern power carving techniques. In this way the forests that define the region have been reanimated into new abstract representations of the landscape, as well as into surreal household objects and furniture that illuminate how our homelife is more deeply rooted in the greater natural landscape than we often recognize.
Julian Watts, Us, 2020

Bleached maple with pink stain

48 × 53 × 13 inches

$55,000.00

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Julian Watts, White Painting (Live Edge I), 2019

Big Leaf Maple wood with white oak frame.

49 × 36 × 2 ¼ inches

$18,500.00

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From the macro to the micro, this exhibition also approaches the idea of homelife as the more private or unseen aspects of how we live. Embracing what at times could be described as a reclusive lifestyle in the woods with his partner, dog, and 3 cats, Watts is dedicated to the idea that there are qualities to a landscape, a home, or a psyche that only reveal themselves after periods of deep introspection and solitude in one’s environment, and when they do, they offer profound insights into where and how we actually live. The sculptures in this exhibition can be seen as manifestations of this idea, where forms seem to be emerging and revealing themselves, being drawn out from within the wood through the solitary carving process.
Julian Watts, White Painting (Live Edge II), 2019

Big Leaf Maple wood with white oak frame.

49 × 36 × 2 ¼ inches

$18,500.00

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Julian Watts, Black Tangle 2, 2018

Hand Carved Eucalyptus Branches with India Ink stain

22 ¾ × 39 × 24 inches

$16,000.00

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Julian Watts, Pinkies, 2018

Carved maple with pink stain

48 × 36 × 1 ½ inches

$16,000.00

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Julian Watts, Pink Statue 2, 2018

Carved pink stone

26 ½ × 8 ½ × 7 ½ inches

$8,500.00

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In this vein, books like Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and Nan Shepherd’s The Living Mountain were important to the development of this collection. In these books, the authors imbed themselves so deeply into their environments that they are able to access an almost mystical understanding of the places they call home. Gothic novels like Frankenstein and Wuthering Heights were also influential to the making of the collection – offering a view of humanity’s relationship to nature in a way so feverishly poetic that it achieves a kind of sublime horror and beauty. Atmospheric Black Metal music even played a role in the creation of the work in this exhibition – specifically bands like Paysage D’Hiver, Wolves in the Throne Room, and Marblebog, where odes to nature, landscape, and weather become abstract and grotesque blocks of sound, interspersed with nature field recordings and beautiful minimalist drones – a sonic mirror of the formal language used in the show. The literature and music that surrounded the studio work for this show has inspired a collection of ambient music compositions by the artist based on sculptures in this collection, to be released following the exhibition.
Julian Watts, Pink Statue 1, 2018

Carved pink stone

12 × 12 × 9 ½ inches

$6,500.00

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Julian Watts, Pink Statue 5 & 6, 2018

Alabaster

9 ¼ × 12 × 6 inches

$9,500.00

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Julian Watts, Bowl, 2017

Bleached maple with pink stain

3 ½ × 9 ½ × 9 ½ inches

Hand-carved bleached maple bowl with pink stain by San Francisco artist Julian Watts for "Feelers", his 2017 solo exhibition at Patrick Parrish Gallery.

$1,800.00

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Julian Watts, Peak, 2017

Maple with India Ink stain

44 × 7 × 6 inches

$6,000.00

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In this vein, books like Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and Nan Shepherd’s The Living Mountain were important to the development of this collection. In these books, the authors imbed themselves so deeply into their environments that they are able to access an almost mystical understanding of the places they call home. Gothic novels like Frankenstein and Wuthering Heights were also influential to the making of the collection – offering a view of humanity’s relationship to nature in a way so feverishly poetic that it achieves a kind of sublime horror and beauty. Atmospheric Black Metal music even played a role in the creation of the work in this exhibition – specifically bands like Paysage D’Hiver, Wolves in the Throne Room, and Marblebog, where odes to nature, landscape, and weather become abstract and grotesque blocks of sound, interspersed with nature field recordings and beautiful minimalist drones – a sonic mirror of the formal language used in the show. The literature and music that surrounded the studio work for this show has inspired a collection of ambient music compositions by the artist based on sculptures in this collection, to be released following the exhibition.
Julian Watts, Face, 2019

Maple

19 × 12 ½ × 6 inches

4800

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Julian Watts, Lumpy, 2019

Western Red Cedar

30 ¾ × 9 × 1 ¾ inches

4800

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The result of these varying ideas, processes, and areas of exploration is an ecosystem of abstract biomorphic wood carvings that range from intimate bowls and vessels to surreal furniture experiments to large, purely sculptural objects, all interacting together to bring to life the landscapes that we call home.
Julian Watts, Bowl (Feelers), 2019

Western Red Cedar

1 ¾ × 25 ¾ × 8 ½ inches

3500

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Julian Watts, Holey Blob, 2019

Walnut

20 ¼ × 7 ½ × 7 inches

5500

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Julian Watts, Arch, 2019

Big Leaf Maple

14 ½ × 13 × 6 ½ inches

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Julian Watts, Blushing Blobs, 2019

Bleached Big Leaf Maple with Pink Dye

15 × 8 × 6 inches

3,800.00

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Julian Watts, Black Bowl, 2020

Big Leaf Maple with India Ink

3 ½ × 11 × 6 ½ inches

$2,800.00

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Julian Watts, Black Cone Bowl, 2020

Cherry with India Ink

9 × 6 ½ × 5 inches

$1,800.00

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Julian Watts, Double Pink Feeler Bowl, 2020

Bleached Big Leaf Maple with Pink Dye

8 ½ × 8 × 4 inches

$2,400.00

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Julian Watts, Large Black Blob, 2020

Big Leaf Maple with India Ink

12 ½ × 9 × 5 inches

$4,000.00

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Julian Watts, Long Vase, 2019

Port Orford Cedar

4 ½ × 27 × 3 ½ inches

$4,500.00

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Julian Watts, Small Black Blob, 2020

Big Leaf Maple with India Ink

9 × 6 ½ × 5 inches

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Julian Watts, Walnut Bowl, 2020

Walnut

5 ½ × 12 × 10 ½ inches

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An important to note from the artist – “While I have been lucky to be able to spend the pandemic exploring my relationship to my home and nature in a poetic and abstract way, for many people the idea of home is more about survival and is constantly under threat from systems of racial and gender oppression in the U.S.” It is important to the gallery and the artist that we raise awareness about the more complex realities of the idea of home in America that are not addressed in this exhibition. A percentage of sales from Homelife will be donated to True Colors United, an organization that seeks to end youth homelessness, focusing on the experiences of LGBTQ young people who are disproportionately likely to struggle with homelessness.














The Hole NYCViewing Room
McKenzie Fine ArtViewing Room
Timothy TaylorViewing Room
Jim Kempner Fine ArtViewing Room
Josée BienvenuViewing Room
Ethan Cohen Fine ArtViewing Room
Grimm GalleryViewing Room
P·P·O·WViewing Room
JHB GalleryViewing Room

The Hole NYC

The Hole is proud to present a group show of idiosyncratic geometric abstraction entitled “Cubed”. Building on our 2016 show “Two on Two” with Johnny Abrahams, Matt Mignanelli, Palma Blank and Russell Tyler, this exhibition was meant to be two on two on two, or 2 x 2 x 2, two cubed and eight artists. Unfortunately it has been so long since we have gotten to do a group show of this nature that there were 14 artists crucial to the exhibition. I suppose we should have added two more and changed the name to “Tesseract”.

"Cubed"

Artist: Andreas Angelidakis, Ara Peterson, Clinton King, Irina Ojovan, Jean Nagai, Jonny Niesche, Kristine Moran, Lilah Rose, Luke Diiorio, Luke Murphy, Palma Blank, Rebecca Ward, Robert Moreland

Regardless of the enforced continuity in our thematic group exhibitions, “Cubed” sprang into 3D from our encounters around the art world in 2019 before it all went on pause. Andreas had an amazing installation at Art Basel’s Art Unlimited (and at The Breeder in Athens), Rebecca Ward had beautiful works with Ronchini Gallery at Art Brussels, Luke Murphy had a fantastic solo exhibition at Shane Cambell in Chicago, Johnny Niesche we saw at ALAC in LA and also Art Athina in Athens. Our gallery director Ray engaged with Kristine Moran after her solo booth at Armory with Daniel Faria along with artists Luke Diiorio, Irina Ojovan and Clinton King. I seized a week of pandemic clouds parting to visit LA and see Lilah Rose, Jean Nagai and Robert Moreland in person-a luxury! But travel restrictions prevented Thomas Trum from coming to do a beautiful wall mural with this custom-built painting machine. We are super grateful that we will be able to welcome you to a socially-distanced opening for “Cubed” and be open with limited occupancy; unlike our last thematic group show “Second Smile” in April that not a single person got to come see.

Andreas Angelidakis, KION, 2020

Foam blocks, digitally printed vinyl upholstery

138 x 39 x 39 inches

350 x 100 x 100 cm

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I seized a week of pandemic clouds parting to visit LA and see Lilah Rose, Jean Nagai and Robert Moreland in person—a luxury! But travel restrictions prevented Thomas Trum from coming to do a beautiful wall mural with this custom-built painting machine. We are super grateful that we will be able to welcome you to a socially-distanced opening for “Cubed” and be open with limited occupancy; unlike our last thematic group show “Second Smile” in April that not a single person got to come see.
Lilah Rose, Seabed, 2020

Foam, muslin, fabric dye, plywood

72 x 24 x 13 inches

183 x 61 x 33 cm

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Irina Ojovan, Sarmizegetusa N 61, 2019

Oil and lacquer on canvas

32 x 28 inches

82 x 71 cm

INQUIRE
Irina Ojovan, Sarmizegetusa N 73, 2019

Oil and lacquer on canvas

32 x 28 inches

82 x 71 cm

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Irina Ojovan, Sarmizegetusa N 71, 2019

Oil and lacquer on canvas

19 x 16 inches

47 x 41 cm

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The works in this exhibition will fill the entire gallery, one office and also our new expanded entrance gallery. Having demolished our little shop zone (which over the past nine years was bookstore, pajama shop, eyeglass store, Matcha cafe, and most recently heritage perfumery) we now have a big front zone and two front doors to welcome you. A special project for this area, Andreas Angelidakis created a tipped-over column to go with our newly exposed little corinthian guy. And festooning our new walls, works by Irina Ojovan shift hue and albedo across their small and subtle compositions.
Irina Ojovan, Sarmizegetusa N 69, 2019

Oil on canvas

19 x 16 inches

47 x 41 cm

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Andreas Angelidakis, KION, 2020

Foam blocks, digitally printed vinyl upholstery

138 x 39 x 39 inches

350 x 100 x 100 cm

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Irina Ojovan, Sarmizegetusa N 65, 2019

Oil and lacquer on canvas

19 x 16 inches

47 x 41 cm

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Robert Moreland, Tall Black Rectangle, 2020

Canvas on wooden panel with acrylic paint, tacks and leather hinges

82 x 19 x 5 inches

208 x 48 x 11 cm

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Robert Moreland,, Narrow Yellow Rectangle, 2020

Canvas on wooden panel with acrylic paint, tacks and leather hinges

12 x 77 x 5 inches

31 x 194 x 12 cm

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The main long wall of the gallery features the single-line machine drawings of Dutch artist Thomas Trum, whose experimentation with drawing and painting machines leads to giant geometries. 3D wall works by Lilah Rose and Robert Moreland fill out this room with their undulating and folding protrusions from the picture plane. In the rear gallery the strands of light in Luke Murphy’s video cube mimic the bright electric lines of Clinton King, Palma Blank and Jean Nagai paintings. In our side office we have installed Ara Peterson’s 1997 video “12 Ball” whose clacking soundtrack invigorates this very enigmatic animation work and likewise the whole exhibition.
Jean Nagai, Wildlife Refuge 3, 2017

Acrylic on canvas

61 x 108 inches

155 x 274 cm

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Luke Diiorio, Untitled, 2020

Oil on canvas over panel

46 x 46 inches

117 x 117 cm

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Palma Blank, Drifter, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

52 x 42 inches

132 x 107 cm

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Jonny Niesche, Atoms Encode (Scarlet), 2020

Aluminum, wood, autolack and voile

63 x 48 x 1 inches

160 x 123 x 2.5 cm

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Jonny Niesche, Atoms Encode (Violet), 2020

Aluminum, wood, autolack and voile

63 x 48 x 1 inches

160 x 123 x 2.5 cm

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Clinton King, Mythmatics, 2020

Oil on linen

64 x 50 inches

163 x 127 cm

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Clinton King, Nine Gates, 2020

Oil on linen

64 x 50 inches

163 x 127 cm

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Australian artist Johnny Niesche creates two infinite void paintings with layers of dyed and painted fabrics, while Luke Diiorio’s shaped canvas-over-panel painting goes in the other direction with its insistent objecthood. In the big back gallery, Rebecca Ward’s skeins of painted silks and de-threaded weaving works pair with Canadian Kristine Moran’s quasi-abstract compositions. The beautiful arcs of black across her line of canvasses starts to resolve into swim caps with the peek of round pink goggles, just as the hint of personal idiosyncrasy pervades this show to keep the preponderance of geometric abstraction light on its feet.
Clinton King, Valiant Thor, 2020

Oil on linen, 64 x 50 inches, 163 x 127 cm

64 x 50 inches

64 x 50 inches

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Luke Murphy, Pixels, Stream, Speed, 2019

LED Matrix panels, MDF panels, mini PC, driver cards, power supplies, cables, software

30.5 x 25 x 25 inches

78 x 64 x 64 cm

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Rebecca Ward, Full Swing, 2018

Acrylic on silk

60 x 45 inches

152 x 114 cm

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Rebecca Ward, White Morph, 2018

Acrylic on silk

60 x 45 inches

152 x 114 cm

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Rebecca Ward, Meridian II, 2018

Acrylic on stitched canvas

64 x 48 inches

163 x 122 cm

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Kristine Moran, Island In The Sky, 2020

Oil on linen

96 x 72 inches

244 x 183 cm

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Kristine Moran, Mad Cap Swimmers – Opposing Strokes 1, 2020

60 x 48 inches

60 x 48 inches

152 x 122 cm

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Kristine Moran, Mad Cap Swimmers – Opposing Strokes 2, 2020

Oil and acrylic on linen

60 x 48 inches

152 x 122 cm

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Kristine Moran, Mad Cap Swimmers – Opposing Strokes 3, 2020

Oil and acrylic on linen

60 x 48 inches

152 x 122 cm

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Kristine Moran, Mad Cap Swimmers – Opposing Strokes 4, 2020

Oil and acrylic on linen

60 x 48 inches

152 x 122 cm

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Kristine Moran, Mad Cap Swimmers – Opposing Strokes 5, 2020

Oil and acrylic on linen

60 x 48 inches

152 x 122 cm

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Kristine Moran, Mad Cap Swimmers – Opposing Strokes 5, 2020

Oil and acrylic on linen

60 x 48 inches

152 x 122 cm

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McKenzie Fine Art

Established in 2002, McKenzie Fine Art exhibits mid-career artists who work in painting, drawing, and sculpture. After ten years in Chelsea, the gallery relocated to the Lower East Side in 2012.

"What Kind of Fool Am I?"

Artist: Paul Corio

Working abstractly with a vocabulary of simple geometric shapes, the longtime focus of Corio’s work is and has always been the primacy of color, ordered both systematically and randomly in terms of value, hue and saturation. As the artist notes, while still animated by the interrelationship of colors, the new paintings are “…very much engaged with the depiction of light, hazy atmosphere, and the plain illusion of depth in the commonly understood sense—not Clement Greenberg’s optical space, but the ordinary three-dimensional space we all inhabit. I then try to fill that space with things one would not encounter in daily life, including surprising color experiences.”

Paul Corio, Call the Cat, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

42 x 30 inches

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Paul Corio, Day-Glo Nero, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

20 x 16 inches

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Several of the paintings have an overall compositional structure inspired by a Roman mosaic floor pattern of repeating, obliquely-set squares surrounding a diamond shape, viewed by the artist at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The square and diamond shapes are organized by color value to create different types of spatial movement within the work.
Paul Corio, The Subterraneans, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

48 x 36 inches

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Paul Corio, Chim Chim Cheree, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

42 x 30 inches

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Paul Corio, Thorny Tale, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

42 x 72 inches

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In some paintings, the squares are filled with “hue circles,” in which wedges of color transition from light to dark and back again. This creates a visual shimmer as well as rotational movement; meanwhile, the color in the central diamond transitions from warm to cool as the eye travels up and down, or a single vivid color sets up a strong contrast to the more subtle hues of the squares. In other works, the squares and diamonds are filled with rectangular bands of color, checkerboard fields, or combinations thereof. Spatial logic is disrupted by an off-register outlining of the overall pattern in solid light or dark colors.
Paul Corio, Regal Speaker, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

71 x 53 inches

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Paul Corio, Begine the Beguine, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

48 x 48 inches

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Paul Corio, The Kremlin Ball, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

20 x 16 inches

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Paul Corio, Big Engine, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

20 x 16 inches

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Paul Corio, Jones and Ricardo, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

20 x 16 inches

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Paul Corio, The Mad Asphodel, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

36 x 24 inches

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The disruption is enhanced by slight breaks in the lines where they occasionally fail to meet or reach the canvas edges. In other works, ribbons of color are assembled from adjacent triangles and set against light or dark fields. The ribbons project and recede in space, moving in straight lines, zigzags, and diagonals, advancing rapidly or pulsating slowly across contrasting fields of color, creating dimensional forms in some places while lying flat in others. The rhythmic and syncopated feel in the paintings is not surprising, as Corio is a jazz drummer and in an earlier life performed with New York punk bands. The lively titles of Corio’s paintings reflect his varied interests outside of painting: not only jazz and 70s punk rock but also horse racing, detective fiction, literature, film, and philosophy.
Paul Corio, Pecan Pattie, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

42 x 30 inches

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Paul Corio, Double Paradiddle, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

20 x 16 inches

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Paul Corio, Mephistophelian, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

20 x 16 inches

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Paul Corio, Nobody Move, 2019

Acrylic on canvas

42 x 30 inches

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Timothy Taylor

Timothy Taylor is a modern and contemporary art gallery in Mayfair, London, owned and founded by the art dealer Timothy Taylor.

"–"

Artist: Armen Eloyan

Armen Eloyan (b. 1966) explores the absurd in his experimental and expressionistic paintings, which are imbued with the pathos and black humour characteristic of the artist’s sardonic outlook. Representing a new foray into pure abstraction for the artist, his new series is suffused with an underlying sense of existential anxiety and chaos intrinsic to the current moment.

Armen Eloyan, Money and Milk I, 2020

Oil on canvas

70 7/8 × 90 1/2 in

180 × 230 cm (T0012292)

$50,000

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Created during the course of the pandemic in Zurich, Switzerland, his new series is divided between three abstract and three figurative works. Derived from a single series of comic drawings, all six paintings are united by the same rapid, chaotic brushstrokes marking each surface.
Armen Eloyan, Money and Milk I, 2020

Oil on canvas

70 7/8 × 90 1/2 in

180 × 230 cm (T0012292)

$50,000

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Armen Eloyan, Old Food and New Fridge, 2020

Oil on canvas

70 7/8 × 90 1/2 in

180 × 230 cm (T0012292)

$50,000

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‘The abstract and figurative works are two halves of a whole: they present the same emotions. It’s just that the abstract works don’t speak – their disturbance is internal,’ Eloyan says.
Armen Eloyan, Untitled (5), 2020

Oil on canvas

120 1/8 × 86 5/8 in

305 × 220 cm(T0012289)

$65,000

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Armen Eloyan, Untitled (4), 2020

Oil on canvas

120 1/8 × 86 5/8 in

305 × 220 cm (T0012288)

Sold

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Known for his casts of tragicomic characters, Eloyan has historically used amalgams of Walt Disney cartoons and comic-book strips to shed light on the dark side of human behaviour. Here his wide-eyed figures seethe with panic in loose swathes of lemon and violet paint that drips down the canvas, while the monumental scale of the abstract canvases immerses the viewer in Eloyan's frenzied gestural marks.

Jim Kempner Fine Art

Jim Kempner Fine Art specializes in contemporary paintings, sculpture, photography, and works on paper, with a special emphasis on contemporary master prints and outdoor sculpture. Our inventory appeals to the established as well as beginning collector. We work closely with art advisors, designers, corporations and museums to expand and enrich their varied collections.

"20 WATTS Red Yellow Blue"

Artist: Jim Watt

Jim Watt (b. 1968) is an American artist and architect based in New Jersey. Watt's paintings and drawings are an obsessive exploration of space, form, and material, a context that marries his work as a practicing architect.

515 West 19th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jim Watt, A New Day, 2020

Oil on canvas

24 x 36”

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Jazz music is foundational to the cadences of Watt’s paintings. This is how he thinks of his works, as harmonious and dissonant as the case may be. His works of art are explorations of color, form, material and light, all interacting with each other in a fluid and fractured musical sequence. His works, together, form a series of improvisations.
Jim Watt, Yellow I, 2020

Oil on canvas

60 x 72”

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Jim Watt, Theme and Variation X, 2020

Oil on canvas

24 x 36”

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Jim Watt, Yellow 3, 2020

Oil on canvas

48 x 72”

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Completed in 1935 by architect John Russell Pope, the National Archives building was designed in the Neoclassical style at a time when most architects were embracing Modernism. Pope’s monument to US history stands in stark contrast, for instance, to Mies van der Rohe’s 1929 Barcelona Pavilion. Criticized and isolated by his peers, Pope was mocked with the nickname “Last of the Romans”. Pope, like other proponents of neoclassical architecture, believed that visual reminders of the Roman Empire connoted power. Earlier this year, a draft executive order named ‘Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again’ was issued by the White House, it mandated that ‘classical architectural style shall be the preferred and default style’ for all future federal buildings in the US.
Jim Watt, Blue on Yellow, 2020

Oil on canvas

72 x 48”

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Jim Watt, Red 6, 2020

Oil on canvas

24 x 18”

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#13), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#14), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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With Vanishing New York, a series of oil paintings on Polaroid photographs and wooden panels the artist offers a counterpoint -intimate in scale and process- to the massive black and white drawings. During the year preceding lockdown, taking long walks around the city with his smartphone, Cormand has been documenting some of the dramatic changes to New York City skyline. In the past decade, the city has known an unprecedented construction boom, generating a sense of dislocation and unreality abruptly interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic.
Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#17), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#68), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#75), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#77), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#79), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#82), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#84), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#86), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#87), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#89), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#94), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#96), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Jim Watt, 100 Watercolors for Spring (#97), 2020

Watercolor

9 x 12”

Framed

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Josée Bienvenu

Josée Bienvenu Gallery opened in September 2004. The gallery has cultivated a highly focused program with an emphasis on drawing in relation to space and time. The gallery represents an intimate selection of both emerging and mid-career international and Latin American artists.

"They Might Be Giants"

Artist: Martí Cormand

Josée Bienvenu is pleased to present They Might be Giants, an exhibition of new works by Spanish born, American artist Marti Cormand. Through large scale pencil on paper drawings and a group of small scale oil paintings, Cormand reflects on the architectures of power with an extraordinary attention to detail.

The exhibition will be on view from September 10 to October 3, the works will then travel to the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum for Twenty Twenty (featuring Oasa DuVerney, Judith Eisler, Andy Mister, William Powhida, Gil Scullion and Diana Shpungin), from October 12, 2020 through March 14, 2021.

Martí Cormand, They Might Be Giants (Triptych), 2020

Graphite on paper

3 Panels: 33h x 25w in each panel

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"Invited to participate in an exhibition about the upcoming US election, I was inspired to visit the National Archives in Washington DC where the US Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights are housed. Walking up the grand staircase on Constitution Avenue, I fixated on the buildings monumental bronze doors – 38 feet high and over 6 tons. A 1936 photograph of the door showing the relationship in scale between the guard and the door is the subject of my recent work ‘They Might Be Giants’. The title is a reference to Cervantes’ Don Quixote, who believes that the windmills in the distance are ‘hulking giants’ and mistakes their blades for ‘long arms’. Feeling threatened by his delusion, he declares his intention to kill them."
Martí Cormand, Archive Building, 2020

Oil on polaroid

4.25h x 3.50w in each

Detail View

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Completed in 1935 by architect John Russell Pope, the National Archives building was designed in the Neoclassical style at a time when most architects were embracing Modernism. Pope’s monument to US history stands in stark contrast, for instance, to Mies van der Rohe’s 1929 Barcelona Pavilion. Criticized and isolated by his peers, Pope was mocked with the nickname “Last of the Romans”. Pope, like other proponents of neoclassical architecture, believed that visual reminders of the Roman Empire connoted power. Earlier this year, a draft executive order named ‘Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again’ was issued by the White House, it mandated that ‘classical architectural style shall be the preferred and default style’ for all future federal buildings in the US.
Martí Cormand, Vanishing NY, Tower, 2019

Oil on wood

22 Panels: 6h x 3w in each panel

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Martí Cormand, Archive Building, 2020

Oil on polaroid

4.25h x 3.50w in

10.79h x 8.89w cm

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With Vanishing New York, a series of oil paintings on Polaroid photographs and wooden panels the artist offers a counterpoint -intimate in scale and process- to the massive black and white drawings. During the year preceding lockdown, taking long walks around the city with his smartphone, Cormand has been documenting some of the dramatic changes to New York City skyline. In the past decade, the city has known an unprecedented construction boom, generating a sense of dislocation and unreality abruptly interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic.
Martí Cormand, Commodification of Air, 2019

Oil on Wood

4 panel polyptych: 6 x 3 inch each panel

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An epilog to the show, Archive Building is a grid of twenty-four oil paintings on Polaroid paper. The title refers again to the National Archive building, as well as to the act of documenting the making of the large pencil drawing They Might be Giants, building an archive of its creation step by step. “Although the documentation of an artwork is usually photographic, I have rendered it in intimate oil paintings by highlighting the tools I used to draw and by showing the process of building up the image. While Polaroid pioneered the instant camera, I have used its film not to register an image via exposure but as a blank surface to paint on. I have always equated Polaroids with time made visible – the time it takes for the image to slowly appear.” (Marti Cormand)
Martí Cormand, 111 West 57th (triptych), 2019

Oil on wood

3 Panels: 6h x 3w in each

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Martí Cormand, They Might Be Giants (Triptych Reversed), 2020

Graphite on paper

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Ethan Cohen Fine Art

Ethan Cohen Gallery occupies a distinct place in contemporary art as a center of innovation across disciplines and countries. It serves artists and clientele through international art fairs, curatorial projects with top institutions and as a center for seminal cultural events. Today Ethan Cohen Gallery has two locations, one in Chelsea in the heart of New York City and the other in Beacon, New York. A groundbreaker in the field of contemporary Chinese art, it was the first gallery to present the Chinese Avant Garde of the of the 1980s to theUnited States. It introduced the works of now celebrated artists, such as Ai Weiwei, Gu Wenda, and Qiu Zhijie. Ethan Cohen Fine Arts today represents a diverse global mix of art, with a continuing focus on emerging as well as established artists.

"I Wake Up In A Foreign Country Every Day"

Artist: Raul de Laura

Ethan Cohen Gallery is pleased to present Raul De Lara: I Wake Up In A Foreign Country Every Day, the first New York solo exhibition of the artist’s work. Raul De Lara’s artistic practice reflects on his experience as an immigrant from Mexico in the United States, expressed through the love of wood.

Raul De Lara, For Being Left Handed, 2020

Pine, Chiclets Gum, Acrylic, Brass, Steel, Particle Board

27 x 12 x 13 in

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Born in 1991, Raul De Lara immigrated from Mexico to the United States at the age of 12 and has been a DACA recipient since 2012. Growing up in Texas as a non-English speaker, feeling neither from here nor there, his work reflects on ideas of nationality, language barriers, body language, and the sense of touch.
Raul de Laura, Tired Broom (Texas), 2020

Pine, Texas Laurel Seeds, Red String, Oak, Lacquer, Straw, Steel

33 x 10 x 2.5 in

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Raul de Laura, 28 Years Later, 2020

Pine, Wisdom Tooth, Water, Rio Grande Dirt, Oak, Acrylic, Tzi-Te Beans, Red String, Wood Glue, Provincetown Sand, Walnut Dust, Terra-cotta Pigment, Lacquer

84 x 15 x 17 in

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Raul de Laura, She's So Tired, 2019

Pine, Lacquer, Straw, Steel, Oak

50 x 13 x 22 in

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Raul de Laura, Tired Shovel (Twin), 2020

Pine, Steel, Lacquer, Oak, Plastic

29 x 6 1/4 x 2 in

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Raul De Lara, DACA/Self-Portrait, 2018

Pine, Stone, Sarape, Silk, Plywood, Plastic Wrap, Acrylic, Oak

44 1/2 x 32 x 28 in

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Born in 1991, Raul De Lara immigrated from Mexico to the United States at the age of 12 and has been a DACA recipient since 2012. Growing up in Texas as a non-English speaker, feeling neither from here nor there, his work reflects on ideas of nationality, language barriers, body language, and the sense of touch. His sculptures explore how stories, folklore, and rituals can be silently communicated through inanimate objects, tools, and foreign environments. De Lara often works with wood, a material that always shows the passing of time on its skin. His aesthetics and materials are inspired by the shared backyard between the United States and Mexico.
Raul De Lara, The Shovel Who Can't Shovel, 2018

Pine, Sand, Oak, Plywood, Water, Wood Glue, Lacquer, Steel

36 x 38 x 10 in

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Raul De Lara, Home, 2017

Sand, Silk, Pine, Oak, Acrylic, Epoxy Resin, Water, Wood Glue

38 x 33 x 18 in

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Raul De Lara, Warmth, 2017

Sand, Pine, MDF, Wood Glue, Oak, Acrylic, Water, Epoxy Resin

30 x 20 x 9 in

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Grimm Gallery

GRIMM was founded in Amsterdam in 2005. Since its establishment, the gallery has been committed to promoting and supporting emerging and mid-career artists who work in a diverse range of media. Representing over thirty international artists, the gallery has two spaces in Amsterdam, and one in New York. GRIMM is expanding to a new 6,000 square foot gallery space in Tribeca, New York set to open in December 2020.

"Stage"

Artist: Matthias Weischer

GRIMM is pleased to announce Stage, Matthias Weischer's first solo exhibition in New York, opening on Sept 3rd* at our 202 Bowery location.

Matthias Weischer, Dawn, 2020

Oil on canvas

19 3/4 x 26 in

50 x 66 cm

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Weischer’s new paintings continue a layered, collage-like approach with recent emphasis on the figure within the domestic realm. The artist addresses the insentient forms of our surroundings with a sense of devotion, resulting in an enchanting reshaping of their symbolism and perceived function.
Matthias Weischer, Blue Corner, 2020

Oil on canvas

40 1/2 x 48 3/8 in

103 x 123 cm

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His paintings are thick with oil paint, bringing to life the substance of the medium and enriching a delicate balance between emptiness and detail. Currently, Weischer’s compositions draw from stage-sets he constructs in his studio, where he considers elements of the decor as characters with different relationships and dynamics. This body of work reflects a continuous search for uniting the emptiness and substance of our daily surroundings.
Matthias Weischer, Disciple 2, 2020

Oil on canvas

24 3/4 x 19 7/8 in

63 x 50.5 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Ha, 2020

Oil on canvas

15 3/4 x 11 3/4 in

40 x 30 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Fon, 2020

Oil on canvas

43 1/4 x 31 1/2 in

110 x 80 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Mirror 2, 2020

Oil on canvas

17 3/4 x 17 3/4 in

45 x 45 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Mirror 1, 2020

Oil on canvas

17 3/4 x 17 3/4 in

45 x 45 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Pole, 2020

Oil on canvas

18 1/8 x 15 in

46 x 38 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Abend, 2020

Oil on canvas

58 1/4 x 83 1/8 in

148 x 211 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Olympia, 2020

Oil on canvas

11 3/4 x 15 3/4 in

30 x 40 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Bulb, 2020

Oil on canvas

15 x 18 1/8 in

38 x 46 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Stage, 2020

Oil on canvas

80 3/4 x 74 1/8 in

205 x 188 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Disciple 1, 2020

Oil on canvas

24 3/4 x 19 7/8 in

63 x 50.5 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Haze, 2020

Oil on canvas

76 x 76 in

193 x 193 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Lounge, 2020

Oil on canvas

91 3/4 x 72 1/2 in

233 x 184 cm

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Matthias Weischer (b. 1973, Elte, DE) lives and works in Leipzig (DE). From 1995 to 2000 he studied at the LeipzigAcademy (DE) where he received his master’s degree in 2003. Weischer is the recipient of numerous awards andscholarships including the Scholarship of the Deutsche Akademie Rom, Villa Massimo, Rome (IT) in 2007. His work is included in institutional and private collections such as; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA( US); Kunstmuseum, The Hague (NL); Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar (NL); Arken Museum of Modern Art (DK) and Museum der Bildende Künste, Leipzig (DE), amongst others.
Following this presentation at GRIMM, works from the exhibition will travel to the Drents Museum in Assen (NL) where Matthias Weischer - Bühne will be on display from November 1st, 2020 - March 28th, 2021.

P·P·O·W

P·P·O·W was founded by Wendy Olsoff and Penny Pilkington in the first wave of the East Village art galleries in New York City in 1983. In 1988 the gallery moved to Soho and in 2002 moved to Chelsea. P·P·O·W maintains a roster of national and international artists. Since its inception, the gallery has remained true to its early vision, showing contemporary work in all media. There is a commitment to the work of pioneering artists and the next generation of artists who create work exploring issues of gender, sexuality, race and social inequality.

"Into Open Air "

Artist: Kyle Dunn

P·P·O·W is pleased to present Into Open Air, an exhibition of new work by Kyle Dunn. Defying categorical restraint, Dunn combines sculptural and painterly traditions, including bas-relief and trompe l’oeil, to express the vibrancy of the masculine emotional landscape not often represented in popular visual culture. Drawing upon a range of influences such as Italian cinema as well as horror and science fiction novels, Dunn’s contorted figures ache with emotional and physical desire. In his first solo exhibition with the gallery, Dunn amplifies raw emotion within his theatrically staged and fantastically rendered reliefs.

Kyle Dunn, Dirt God, 2020

acrylic on epoxy resin and foam panel

43 x 64 x 2.5 ins.

109.2 x 162.6 x 6.4 cm

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Capturing the simultaneous anxiety and nascent hope of our present moment, Dunn’s lush, luminous, and physiologically charged paintings describe the painful romance of overcoming loss before beginning anew. In works such as Boy on Table, Dunn depicts his classical figure in a moment of manic confinement, hovering in a virtual landscape and folded acrobatically around a modern marble table.
Kyle Dunn, Waiting, 2020

acrylic on wood panel

40 x 30 x 1.5 ins.

101.6 x 76.2 x 3.8 cm

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Matthias Weischer, Reading, 2020

acrylic on epoxy resin and foam panel

64 x 48 x 2.5 ins.

162.6 x 121.9 x 6.4 cm

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Intertwining auto-biographical and fictional narratives, Dunn embraces the comedic absurdity of overwhelming emotions in this exhibition. Reflecting on his proclivity for melodrama, Dunn notes, “There is a kind of humor and silliness to big emotions, at least when you are looking back and processing. Making paintings is a way for me to distill messy situations in my life down to something understandable.” From the frenzied captivity of Headlights to the muddy repose of Dirt God, Into Open Air chroniclesthe chaotic journey through grief toward new emotional terrain.
Kyle Dunn, Boy on Table, 2020

acrylic on epoxy resin and foam panel

48 x 40 x 2.5 ins.

121.9 x 101.6 x 5.1 cm

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Kyle Dunn, Headlights, 2020

acrylic on epoxy resin and foam panel

47 x 42 x 2.5 ins.

119.4 x 106.7 x 6.4 cm

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Kyle Dunn, Going Down, 2020

acrylic and spray paint on epoxy resin and foam panel

54 x 37 x 2.5 ins.

137.2 x 94 x 6.4 cm

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Kyle Dunn, Bolt, 2020

acrylic on illustration board

30 x 20 ins

76.2 x 50.8 cm

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Kyle Dunn, Window, 2020

acrylic on epoxy resin and foam panel

48 x 54 x 2.5 ins.

162.6 x 137.2 x 6.4 cm

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Kyle Dunn (b. 1990) lives and works in Queens, NY. He grew up in Michigan and received his BFA in Interdisciplinary Sculpture at Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA). He has had two solo exhibitions in New York at Sardine, 2017 and Thierry Goldberg Gallery, 2018 and has been included in group exhibitions at at Galerie Maria Bernheim, Zurich; Little Berlin, Philadelphia, PA; Nationale, Portland, OR; Part 2 Gallery; Oakland, CA; and Ground Floor Gallery, Brooklyn, NY.

JHB Gallery

Founded by Jayne Baum in 1982, JHB Gallery has furthered the practices of a diverse group of emerging and established contemporary photographers and artists. Through a series of early, influential exhibitions, the gallery helped articulate a position for contemporary photography in the larger art world context. Historically representing work across mediums, the gallery pairs serious connoisseurship with the praxis of artists who conceptually explore their numerous disciplines developing both personal and broader ideological narratives. Representing a wide range of contemporary international artists, JHB Gallery continues to curate exhibitions at the gallery's West Village space, and across a variety of alternative platforms.

"LUMINATIONS"

Artist: Amanda Means

JHB Gallery is pleased to present selections of work by New York artist Amanda Means, who has been at the forefront of experimental photographic practice for over thirty years. Her iconic images of water glasses and light bulbs, and her innovative abstracts, are produced using an array of techniques including camera-less processes, the manipulation of darkroom chemistry, and large-format Polaroid printing. Means has devised a unique process in which her subjects’ innate luminosity is engaged in order to directly create a photographic print—a method that at once recalls photographic pioneers, while striking a tone of singular minimalist directness that Means has made all her own.

Amanda Means, Water Glass 8, 2004

Gelatin silver print

46 x 38 inches

48 x 40 inches

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Amanda Means, Water Glass 1, 2004

Gelatin silver print

46 x 38 inches

48 x 40 inches

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Means' breakthrough in camera-less photography came with her conversion of a nineteenth century wooden camera into a darkroom enlarger, which allowed her to create a foot-square illuminated chamber into which she was able to place whole objects. Her monumental Water Glass prints are created by the light passing through the glasses, ice, and water, exploiting the objects' natural translucency to create radiant reversed black and white imagery, where the brightest lights create the inkiest darks in the print. The water glass itself becomes its own light source, fostering a unique and elevated visual awareness of its objecthood.
Amanda Means, Water Glass 3, 2004

Gelatin silver print

46 x 38 inches

48 x 40 inches

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Amanda Means, Water Glass 2 (Variant), 2004

Gelatin silver print

46 x 38 inches

48 x 40 inches

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"Most photography represents the reflection of light back from an object’s surface. I alter this traditional equation by photographing the light that passes through the water glass, capturing a myriad of overlapping detail on its front, interior and back, showing air bubbles, remarkably rich and nuanced sweaty drips of condensation and the delicate abstract shapes and lines of the water glass itself."
Amanda Means, Water Glass 3, 2004

Gelatin silver print

46 x 38 inches

48 x 40 inches

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Amanda Means, Water Glass 4, 2011

Gelatin silver print

46 x 38 inches

48 x 40 inches

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“I am interested in finding ways to illuminate objects from within, to delve inward, to work more from the interior", Means has written, and the artist takes this focus on luminosity and inner radiance a stage further with her colored Light Bulb pieces. Produced at the Polaroid 20x24 Studio in New York with one of only five large-sized Polaroid cameras ever made, Means has created a series of intensely colored and detailed images of incandescent lightbulbs, the bulbs themselves providing the light for the images' exposures—filtered through a nuanced set of exposure settings and colored gels. The self-reflexive tension and catalogue-like numbering of the works plays minimalist serialism off the works' actual auratic glow, the artist deftly orchestrating the transcendent aesthetic potential of photographic objectivity.
Amanda Means, Light Bulb (14360LB), 2007

20x24 Polaroid

31 x 22 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Light Bulb (14353LB), 2007

20x24 Polaroid

31 x 22 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Light Bulb (14418LB), 2007

20x24 Polaroid

31 x 22 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Light Bulb (14417LB), 2007

20x24 Polaroid

31 x 22 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Light Bulb (14348LB), 2007

20x24 Polaroid

31 x 22 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Light Bulb (14411LB), 2007

20x24 Polaroid

31 x 22 inches

Unique

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In her recent abstract works, Means continues to forge new paths, now making the materials and chemistry of the darkroom itself the physical subject of her work. Having been employed in the past as a master printer for artists such as Robert Mapplethorpe and Roni Horn (where a tiny blemish could mean having to remake a print all over again), Means has spoken of the freedom of being able to score and fold her photographic paper, allowing the liquid chemicals to drip, splash, and flow over it.
Amanda Means, Folded and Crushed 69 (Lumen), 2017

Gelatin silver print

20 x 20 inches

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Amanda Means, Folded and Crushed 77, 2017

Gelatin silver print, selenium and gold toned

20 x 20 inches

Unique

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"There is an intriguing interaction between the rigid, straight lines of the scored, folded paper and the way they interrupt the loose flowing rivulets of the liquid developer as it cascades down the cut surface of the paper. The scoring and folding are absolutely controlled. The flowing liquid is by contrast, quite unpredictable."
Amanda Means, Folded and Crushed 41, 2017

Gelatin silver print

29 3/4 x 29 7/8 inches

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Amanda Means, Folded and Crushed 38, 2017

Gelatin silver print

30 x 30 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Folded and Crushed 11, 2015

Gelatin silver print

24 x 20 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means, Folded and Crushed 16, 2015

Gelatin silver print

24 x 20 inches

Unique

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Amanda Means is a graduate of Cornell University and SUNY Buffalo, and is a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow, awarded for her contribution to contemporary photography. She has exhibited widely in the US and abroad and her work is included in public collections including Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA ; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; and National Museum of Photography, Film and Television, Bradford, England.